Media, Crisis and The Making Of Common Sense

Why is the vast majority of Irish media dominated with an undoubting and uncritical attitude towards a single theory of the ‘crisis’? What role does it play in legitimising, rather than challenging, the structural causes of growing inequality? And what does this mean for radical interpretations of democracy, public space and the remaking of common sense?

In this Live Register podcast, we’re joined by Julien Mercille and Henry Silke, two academics who have been carrying out separate research relating to the Irish media.

Julien Marcille lectures at the School of Geography in UCD and has recently published research on how the Irish mainstream media have covered the Irish “crisis” from a pro-austerity position over the last five years. Henry Silke is a postgraduate researcher at the School of Communications DCU, who has been examining the political role of the Irish press during the crisis.

We used their research to frame a wider discussion of the real role of mainstream media in Ireland today, exploring how market ideology is central to how mainstream media frames public discourse, very much at odds to the perception of mainstream media holding truth to power.


  1. Terence Cosgrave

    As a journalist, I strongly agree that there is a bias in media towards the views of the middle-class from which the vast majority of journalists come.
    The news is sometimes put out there without any analysis of what it means or why it happens.
    There are no investigations in Irish media, and often when a freelancer does one, the papers baulk because of ‘legal’ issues.
    Thanks for the podcast. Interesting discussion.
    Terence Cosgrave

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